Archive for the ‘Reading’ Category

Talking to Kim Thuy

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

This Sunday, October 27 at 1pm, I will be talking to the Canadian-Vietnamese author Kim Thuy as part of the Stockholm Literature Festival at The Museum of Modern Art in Stockholm. I am presently reading her novel ‘M√£n’ which has just been released here in Sweden. I am enjoying it immensely and look forward to Sunday.

Kim thuy

m√£n-189x300

 

Klick here to read more about the Festival.

And here to hear the conversation.

Man Booker Prize 2013

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

New Zealand writer Eleanor Catton wins the Man Booker Prize for her novel ‘Luminaries’. Wonderful, just wonderful! Now, let’s see if this extraordinary achievement gets the media attention it deserves. In New Zealand.

eleanor Catton

Read more here.

The Nobel Prize for literature 2013

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

Alice Munro was number two on my list of candidates for the Nobel Prize for literature (Paul Auster has been my favourite for years). I am so very pleased for her sake, of course. And also for the sake of Canadian literature – I live in another Commonwealth country whose literature is largely ignored internationally, New Zealand – and for the sake of the short story genre. Congratulations!

alice munro

Now that it will likely be some time before another author from the American continent will be chosen, may I here propose Maurice Gee, a New Zealand writer of great distinction whose works portray this distant small country and the people who inhabit it with warmth and passion. To explore this wealth of wonderful stories, begin with ‘Plumb’ …

Maruice Gee

Swedish book reviews

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

Doing what you should never do – googling myself – I came upon this interesting blog:

Swedish Book Review

I thought the review of my own novel, ‘The Kindness of Your Nature’/’The Memory of Love’, was interesting and thoughtful, and I continued to read several others. I recommend it for anybody with an interest in Swedish literature.

Remnants and hope

Friday, October 22nd, 2010

roses in snow2

Snow overnight. Even before I pulled up the blind I knew. I think it is the sound. Or rather the silence, it’s as if a soft duvet has been draped over the the city. But this is is just an early teaser, probably gone before the end of the day. Still, it makes me sad to to think that I am about to leave. I have a perverse love of the kind of weather most people call ‘bad’. This time of the year in this part of the world is my element. My most creative environment.

I have now handed over a good portion of my new book to my Swedish publisher. It felt momentous: firstly it’s far from complete and may yet undergo substantial rewrites, secondly it’s the first time I have tried to write simultaneously in English and Swedish. But so far, so good, apparently. I am grateful for the response and feel more hopeful about this novel than I have in a very long time. So, time to dive into the world I have created and live with it, inside it.

I am reading a very interesting novel by Swedish author Sigrid Comb√ľchen, ‘Spill’ (The title is hard to translate. The Swedish word means scrap, pieces that never came to be used, wasted bits. Still, I think ‘Remnants’ would be an appropriate translation). The author is a character in the novel and here is what she says about the process of writing fiction:

‘The long upward slope of springtime that belonged to the novel I was working on was about to reach its cusp or critical mass. This means that the story is about to become a self functioning world, and no longer needs to be recreated every morning. Soon it confirms itself in everything you see and do. You exclusively note affirmations. You exaggerate and restrict your impressions and transform them into something suited for the novel.’

Like with so many of my reflections, someone else has expressed them better than I ever could.

Spill

Death in Danzig

Friday, March 23rd, 2007

I am reading Death in Danzig by Stefan Chwin and I am now about halfway through. It is a strange and rather wonderful book. (more…)